LAND – INTERMEDIATE

Instructions: Hover over and click the large dark green leaves to learn about Indigenous Peoples’ relationship to the land or how to say “thank you” in some Indigenous languages.

Land – Intermediate – EN
Worldview “recognizes the interconnectedness and spirit within all things.” “...Culture is founded upon a deep connection to our land, waters, and all living things.” It is impossible to separate us from our connection to the land. The land sustains our body, mind, and spirit. kinanâskomitin = I thank you Marsee = Thank you We show respect to the land by taking care of it while offering thanks (gratitude) to nature for sustaining our lives. Knowledge comes from the land and many ceremonies connect back to the natural world. Indigenous stories and ceremonies are connected to the land. The land is like our mother. “Knowledge and ways of knowing are embedded in languages: Indigenous languages contain knowledge about these lands, the earth, and how to live in harmony with it and each other…” “The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. ” Niá:wen = Thank you Mahsi’ choo = Thank you very much Nitsiniiyi'taki = I thank you Yawʌko - A big thank you Nakurmiik = Thank you

Worldview “recognizes the interconnectedness and spirit within all things.”

Snuneymuxw First Nation. (2013). Coast Salish Culture. From Snuneymuxw.ca: https://www.snuneymuxw.ca/nation/culture/coast-salish-culture

“...Culture is founded upon a deep connection to our land, waters, and all living things.”

Snuneymuxw First Nation. (2013). Coast Salish Culture. From Snuneymuxw.ca: https://www.snuneymuxw.ca/nation/culture/coast-salish-culture

It is impossible to separate us from our connection to the land. The land sustains our body, mind, and spirit.

Chartier, C. (1993). Métis Lands and Resources. In T. R. Peoples, Sharing the Harvest: The Road to Self-Reliance, Report of the National Round Table on Aboriginal Economic Development and Resources (pp. 70-89). Ottawa: Canada Communication Group Publishing

kinanâskomitin = I thank you

Nêhiyawak
Plains Cree

Marsee = Thank you

Michif
Métis

We show respect to the land by taking care of it while offering thanks (gratitude) to nature for sustaining our lives.

Knowledge comes from the land and many ceremonies connect back to the natural world.

Indigenous stories and ceremonies are connected to the land.

The land is like our mother.

“Knowledge and ways of knowing are embedded in languages: Indigenous languages contain knowledge about these lands, the earth, and how to live in harmony with it and each other…”

Makokis, D. J., Shirt, M. V., Chisan, S. L., Mageau, A. Y., & Steinhauer, D. M. (2010). mâmawi-nehiyaw iyinikahiwewin: Social Science and Humanities Research Council Project Final Report. Blue Quills First Nations College. From https://www.bluequills.ca/wp

“The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. ”

Littlebear, D. L. (2009). Naturalizing Indigenous Knowledge: Synthesis Paper. Canadian Council on Learning Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre. From http://neatoeco.com/iwise3/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/NaturalizingIndigenousKnowledge_LeroyLittlebear.pdf

Niá:wen = Thank you

Kanien'kéha 
Mohawk

Mahsi’ choo = Thank you very much

Gwich’in

Nitsiniiyi'taki = I thank you

Kainai 
Blackfoot

Yawʌko - A big thank you

Haudenosaunee Confederacy
Oneida

Nakurmiik = Thank you

Inuktitut (INUIT)
South Qikiqtaaluk