Land – Advanced – EN
“The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. The ecological aspect of Indigenous knowledge is all about the land. The land is a source of identity for Aboriginal people.” “Our relationship with land would be described in English as ‘sacred’ however this description does not properly address the depth and breadth of how important the land is to us. It is our mother. The use of her must be done in a way that does not impair her abilities to provide for the ‘coming faces’. “ “Traditional knowledge, languages, cultural practices and oral traditions built up over the millennia are all connected to the land.” kinanâskomitin = I thank you Marsee = Thank you “Indigenous languages contain knowledge about the land and how to live in harmony with it and each other.” “We are in a sacred relationship with all things in the natural world - the land, waters and air, and all of the plants and animals we live with. Respect for the spirit and life in each of these, and the intricate relationships and interconnectedness we are all in together is a key value and principle of our culture.” “Indigenous Peoples are inextricably related to land: it sustains our spirits and bodies; it determines how our societies develop and operate based on available environmental and natural resources; and our socialization and governance flow from this intimate relationship.” “First Nations have a special relationship with the earth and all living things in it. This relationship is based on a profound spiritual connection to Mother Earth that guided Indigenous Peoples to practice reverence, humility and reciprocity. It is also based on the subsistence needs and values extending back thousands of years.” “Knowledge and ways of knowing are embedded in languages: Indigenous languages contain knowledge about these lands, the earth, and how to live in harmony with it and each other…” “The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. ” Niá:wen = Thank you Mahsi’ choo = Thank you very much Nitsiniiyi'taki = I thank you Yawʌko - A big thank you Nakurmiik = Thank you

“The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. The ecological aspect of Indigenous knowledge is all about the land. The land is a source of identity for Aboriginal people.”

Littlebear, D. L. (2009). Naturalizing Indigenous Knowledge: Synthesis Paper. Canadian Council on Learning Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre. From http://neatoeco.com/iwise3/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/NaturalizingIndigenousKnowledge_LeroyLittlebear.pdf

“Our relationship with land would be described in English as ‘sacred’ however this description does not properly address the depth and breadth of how important the land is to us. It is our mother. The use of her must be done in a way that does not impair her abilities to provide for the ‘coming faces’. “

Haudenosaunee Confederacy. (n.d.). Land Aquisition. From Haundenosaunee Confederacy: https://www.haudenosauneeconfederacy.com/land-aquisition/

“Traditional knowledge, languages, cultural practices and oral traditions built up over the millennia are all connected to the land.”

Joseph, B. (2015, May 7). FIrst Nation Relationship to the Land. From Indigenous Corporate Training Inc.: https://www.ictinc.ca/blog/first-nation-relationship-to-the-land

kinanâskomitin = I thank you

Nêhiyawak
Plains Cree

Marsee = Thank you

Michif
Métis

“Indigenous languages contain knowledge about the land and how to live in harmony with it and each other.”

Makokis, D. J., Shirt, M. V., Chisan, S. L., Mageau, A. Y., & Steinhauer, D. M. (2010). mâmawi-nehiyaw iyinikahiwewin: Social Science and Humanities Research Council Project Final Report. Blue Quills First Nations College. From https://www.bluequills.ca/wp

“We are in a sacred relationship with all things in the natural world - the land, waters and air, and all of the plants and animals we live with. Respect for the spirit and life in each of these, and the intricate relationships and interconnectedness we are all in together is a key value and principle of our culture.”

Snuneymuxw First Nation. (2013). Coast Salish Culture. From Snuneymuxw.ca: https://www.snuneymuxw.ca/nation/culture/coast-salish-culture 

“Indigenous Peoples are inextricably related to land: it sustains our spirits and bodies; it determines how our societies develop and operate based on available environmental and natural resources; and our socialization and governance flow from this intimate relationship.”

Chartier, C. (1993). Métis Lands and Resources. In T. R. Peoples, Sharing the Harvest: The Road to Self-Reliance, Report of the National Round Table on Aboriginal Economic Development and Resources (pp. 70-89). Ottawa: Canada Communication Group Publishing

“First Nations have a special relationship with the earth and all living things in it. This relationship is based on a profound spiritual connection to Mother Earth that guided Indigenous Peoples to practice reverence, humility and reciprocity. It is also based on the subsistence needs and values extending back thousands of years.”

Assembly of First Nations. (n.d.). Honouring Earth. From AFN.ca: https://www.afn.ca/honoring-earth/

“Knowledge and ways of knowing are embedded in languages: Indigenous languages contain knowledge about these lands, the earth, and how to live in harmony with it and each other…”

Makokis, D. J., Shirt, M. V., Chisan, S. L., Mageau, A. Y., & Steinhauer, D. M. (2010). mâmawi-nehiyaw iyinikahiwewin: Social Science and Humanities Research Council Project Final Report. Blue Quills First Nations College. From https://www.bluequills.ca/wp

“The land is a sacred trust from the Creator. The land is the giver of life like a mother. ”

Littlebear, D. L. (2009). Naturalizing Indigenous Knowledge: Synthesis Paper. Canadian Council on Learning Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre. From http://neatoeco.com/iwise3/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/NaturalizingIndigenousKnowledge_LeroyLittlebear.pdf

Niá:wen = Thank you

Kanien'kéha 
Mohawk

Mahsi’ choo = Thank you very much

Gwich’in

Nitsiniiyi'taki = I thank you

Kainai 
Blackfoot

Yawʌko - A big thank you

Haudenosaunee Confederacy
Oneida

Nakurmiik = Thank you

Inuktitut (INUIT)
South Qikiqtaaluk